Fruit and Vegetable Shopping Checklist

 

fresh-fruits-and-vegetables1

 

Although you’ve probably heard that it’s good to eat at least 5 fruits and vegetables a day, this checklist will make it easier and more interesting for you to reach your goal.

According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, most Americans do not consume enough potassium, calcium, vitamin D, or dietary fiber. Make sure you’re not one of that crowd by eating plenty of fresh, whole foods.  More than 90% of both adults and children do not eat the amount of fruits and vegetables recommended. The obesity rate in American children has tripled over the past 30 years, which may lead to an expected lifespan less than that of their parents.  Help your children to consume more fruits and veggies and avoid childhood obesity, starting by just adding one serving of fresh fruits or vegetables to each meal. Everyone can benefit from adding just one or two servings of fruits and vegetables.  And remember, there are many ways to enjoy and add more fruits and veggies in your diet. It can be different product forms: fresh (always best), frozen, dried, canned or juice.

Do Smart Shopping and Menu Planning With the List Below

  • If there are other fruits and vegetables that we missed, be sure to let us know.
  • Put a check beside all the fruits and vegetables you like, and a different symbol by some you want to try.
  • To add variety, make copies of our checklist in order to plan your menus from day to day, or week to week.

Also, be sure to check out the three special points below this checklist.

 

AApple
Apricot
Artichokes
Asparagus
Avocado (Limit because it is high in saturated fat)
BBanana
Bean curds (Tofu)
Bean sprouts
Beans
Beets
Blackberries
Black beans
Black eyed peas
Blueberries
Bok Choy
Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Butterbeans
CCabbage
Callaloo
Cannelini beans
Cantaloupe
Carrot
Cauliflower
Celery
Chayote
Cherries
Chickpeas (or garbanzos)
Coconut (Limit because it’s high in saturated fat)
Collard greens
Corn
Cucumber
Currants
DDates EEggplant FFig
Fruit juices
(except tomato, and “fresh is best” for fruits and fruit juices)
GGarlic
Grapefruit
Grapes
Green beans
Green peas
Green peppers
Guava
HHoneydew   melon I
J KKale
Kidney beans
Kiwi
Kumquat (Comquat)
LLeeks
Lemon
Lentils
Lettuce (green & red)
Lima beans
Lime
MMango
Mulberries
Mushrooms (cooked only)
Mustard greens
NNavy   Beans
Nectarine
OOkra
Onion
Orange
PPapaya
Peach
Peas
Pear
Persimmon
Pigeon Peas
Pineapple
Pinto beans
Plantain
Plum
Pomegrante
Potatoes
Prunes
Pumpkin
Q RRadish
Raisins
Raspberries
Red bell peppers
Rutabagas
TTangerine
Tofu (bean curds)
Tomatoes
Turnip greens
SScallion
Snap peas
Snow peas
Soybeans
Spinach
Split peas
Squash
Strawberries
Stringbeans
Sweet peas
Sweet peppers
Sweet potatoes

U

V WWatercress
Watermelon
X
YYams
Yellow peppers
ZZucchini  

Three Special Points:

1. If you plan meals, or eat with others, be sensitive to what their tastes are, because “Eating is often a social experience“, which means it should be enjoyed by all involved.

 2. Generally speaking, the healthiest vegetables are the dark green leafy ones, and the healthiest fruits are the deeply colored ones.

 3. There is much additional information to help you “Eat Healthy” in Health Power’s Food and Fitness Channel, and in its Tip Sheet Section.

 

fruits - vegetables

 Remember our motto:  Knowledge + Action = Power!®

 

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