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Trans Fats

Trans Fats are a type of unsaturated fats found in many cooked food products. They are not necessary, and provide no known benefit to human health. In fact, eating trans fats increases the risk of developing coronary artery disease (also called coronary heart disease).which is a leading cause of death. Most trans fats are produced as a side effect of partial hydrogenation of plant oils. Trans fats act like saturated fats by raising the level of bad or LDL cholesterol. However, unlike saturated fats, they also decrease the level of good or HDL cholesterol.

In July 2003, the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) issued a regulation that requires manufacturers to list trans fat on their food labels. It allows trans fat levels of less than 0.5 (or ½) grams per serving to be labeled as 0 grams per serving. Other terms on food labels that mean a food contains trans fat are shortening, partially hydrogenated vegetable oil, or hydrogenated vegetable oil. The higher up in the list of ingredients one sees trans fat or either of these terms, the more trans fat there is in the product.

Trans fats are found in such foods as:

baked products

cookies

crackers

fried foods

some margarines

some salad dressings

 

snack foods

 

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