A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Weight Loss Surgery

Weight Loss Surgery is also called Bariatric Surgery, Bypass Surgery, Obesity Surgery, and Gastric Bypass Surgery. This surgery is only considered for people with severe obesity, like those with a BMI (body mass index) of 40 or more, or between 35 and 40 when there are also serious conditions like high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure (or hypertension), and diabetes. Another way to consider qualifications is in men who are usually 100 or more pounds overweight, and in women, 80 pounds or more overweight, who cannot lose weight with a healthy diet and regular exercise.

In weight loss surgery, the surgeon removes part of the stomach or small intestine in order to digest less food and, thus, lose weight. In changing the person’s digestive system (stomach and/or small intestine), the person can’t eat or digest as much food at one time without becoming very uncomfortable. As a result, he or she takes in fewer calories.

Because of the current high levels of obesity among all age groups in the U.S., and the limited success of non-surgical weight loss methods, weight loss surgery is being used more often for severe obesity. However, after the surgery, healthy eating AND regular exercise are almost always necessary to keep the weight off. Possible complications of the surgery include infection, hernias, and blood clots.

Return to Directory