HIVDiagnoses in U.S. by Race and Ethnicity (By CDC – 2012)

HIV/AIDS: Still a Serious African American and Hispanic Health Problem

Although HIV/AIDS isn’t talked about much anymore. it’s important to remember that HIV and AIDS are still at an epidemic level in the African American community, and also higher in Hispanics than in Whites. The table below shows  how serious the problem still is in African Americans and Hispanics.  

Why HIV/AIDS in Minorities/Multicultural Populations Still Needs Special Attention and Efforts

  1. The cost of treating AIDS is still high although it is no longer a fatal disease.  Therefore, a sustained focus on HIV prevention continues to be a high priority, especially in those populations and groups most affected. 
  2. The intermittent illnesses and multiple demands of treatment can, for some, interfere with productivity in the workplace, whose overall composition is increasingly consists of minorities.
  3. While treatment with multiple drug therapy has changed AIDS from a fatal illness to a chronic disease, the financial and other treatment related costs are very high, just as with other serious chronic disease.

For the above reasons, prevention is obviously better than treatment, especially since there’s still no  cure.

 

 

HIV Diagnoses in the U.S. by Race and Ethnicity (By CDC – 2012) 

Race or Ethnicity

Estimated No. HIV Diagnoses (CDC)

Percent Total HIV Diagnoses

Estimated Percent Total US Population (US Census Bureau)

American Indian/Alaska Native

228

<1%

0.2%

Asian/Pacific Islander

1,038

2%

5.5%

Black/African American

22,581

47%

13.2%

Hispanic/Latino

9,816

20%

17.1%

White

13,291

28%

62.6%

Multiple Races

1,036

2%

?

Total

47,990

99%

98.6 %

 respect_protect_torn

Remember the Health Power motto, or tagline:

Knowledge + Action = Power! ®

 

 

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