Infant Mortality

Infant Mortality

infant mortality

Infant Mortality Rate refers to the number of deaths before one (1) year ofage among every 1000 newborns. It is widely accepted as the single best indicator of community health in the world. The rate permits comparison of the health status of various communities, neighborhoods, cities, states and countries. In the U.S., in 1998 the infant mortality rate is the 28th in the world, with rates being generally higher (worse) in racial and ethnic minority populations. For example, there are significant differences in infant mortality rates between inner city communities and reservations, and lower income communities as compared to middle and upper income communities. As another example, whereas the national infant mortality rate in 1998 was 6.9 deaths in 1,000 live births, in African Americans, the rate is more than twice as high, at 14.1 deaths in 1,000 live births.

Highlights


Leading Causes of Infant Mortality (Death)
Approaches to Prevention
 
 
This term means deaths before one (1) year of age. The Infant Mortality Rate, or number of deaths before one year of age among every 1000 newborns, is widely accepted as the single best indicator of community health in the world. The rate permits comparison of the health status of various communities, within and among community districts or neighborhoods, cities, states and nations.

In the U.S., there are significant differences in infant mortality rates between inner city communities and reservations, and middle and upper income communities. We plan to address possible reasons for these differences. Until we get to discuss known and suspected contributors to the significantly higher infant mortality rates in communities of color, we recommend the American Academy of Pediatrics for more information, Tel. (847)434-4000. Their web site can be reached through our Relevant Resources section.