Preventing and Controlling “Our Big 4 Targets”

Preventing and Controlling “Our Big 4 Targets”

 

This is a time of growth and rebirth. This holds true for the things in nature as well as for ourselves. Over the course of the long cold months (and maybe a little longer than that), we forget about the importance of moving a lot, breathing fresh air and focusing on fresh and healthy foods. Those extra winter pounds, and time spent on the couch can provide more than just wardrobe woes.

Extra weight and a sedentary, or inactive, lifestyle can contribute to four ‘big’ health concerns – obesitydiabeteshypertension and heart disease.

Obesity increases your risk for diabetes, hypertension and heart disease. So one thing you can do to add a healthy spring to your step this April is to make sure you take care of yourself. If your goal is to lose some of that extra winter weight and get active, you should check with your doctor first.

To create a plan for ‘springing’ into health

o    See your doctor or another qualified health professional

o    Set your goals (such as, lose a certain number of pounds, or lower your blood pressure by a certain amount)

o    Work together to create a plan

If you are interested in spring cleaning, just setting up some new healthy habits like the following may be of interest:

Spring clean your pantry, cabinets, and freezer

http://www.thekitchn.com/clean-out-your-pantry-fridge-freezer-in-20-minutes-a-day-for-5-days-182087

Plant a vegetable garden in your yard or on your porch or balcony

http://www.no-dig-vegetablegarden.com/container-vegetable-gardens.html

Find your local farmer’s markets

http://www.localharvest.org/

Go for a walk, hike or bike ride

Take the kids to the park or playground

Plan a healthy picnic

Embrace the sunshine (with the sunblock)

Play a game of tag with the kids, or fetch with the dog

So go forth, act afresh, dust off the winter’s cobwebs and embrace this time of growth and rebirth.

Happy Spring!
More about our Big 4 Minority Health Targets
 

DIABETES

National Diabetes Fact Sheet – 2011

(Retrieved from http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/diabetes-statistics/and released Jan. 26, 2011)

Total prevalence of diabetes

Total: 25.8 million children and adults in the United States or 8.3% of the population
Diagnosed: 18.8 million people
Undiagnosed: 7.0 million people
Pre-diabetes: 79 million people*

* In contrast to the 2007 National Diabetes Fact Sheet, which used fasting glucose data to estimate undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes, the 2011 National Diabetes Fact Sheet uses both fasting glucose and A1C levels to derive estimates for undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes. These tests were chosen because they are most frequently used in clinical practice.

New Cases:

1.9 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in people aged 20 years and older in 2010.

 

Demographics of Diabetes
Age

Less than 20 years

·         215,000, or 0.26% of all people in this age group have diabetes

·         About 1 in every 400 children and adolescents has diabetes

20+

·         25.6 million or 11.3% of all people in this age group have diabetes

65+

·         10.9 million, or 26.9% of all people in this age group have diabetes
Gender

Men

13.0 million, or 11.8% of all men aged 20 years or older have diabetes

Women

12.6 million, or 10.8% of all women aged 20 years or older have diabetes
Race/Ethnicity
After adjusting for population age differences, 2007-2009 national survey data for people diagnosed with diabetes, aged 20 years or older include the following prevalence by race/ethnicity:
Non-Hispanic Whites 7.1%
Asian Americans 8.4%
Non-Hispanic Blacks 12.6%
Hispanics 11.8%

Cubans

7.6%

Mexican Americans

13.3%

Puerto Ricans

13.8%

Additional Resources:

·         Diabetes Interactive Atlases: http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/atlas/

·         CDC Fact Sheet: http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/ndfs_2011.pdf

·         CDC Fact Sheet en espanol:http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/ndfsSpanish.pdf

OBESITY

American Heart Association Statistical Fact Sheet: 2013 Update

(http://www.heart.org/idc/groups/heart-public/@wcm/@sop/@smd/documents/downloadable/ucm_319588.pdf)

Demographics of Obesity
Age

2-19

23.9 million children are overweight or obese; 33% of boys & 30% of girls

20+

154.7 million are overweight or obese (Of these, 78.4 million are obese)
Gender

Men

79.9 million men (36.8 million men are obese)

Women

74.8 million women (41.6 million women are obese)
Race/Ethnicity

Non-Hispanic Whites

73.1 percent of men and 60.2 percent of women

Non-Hispanic Blacks

68.7 percent of men and 79.9 percent of women

Mexican Americans

81.3 percent of men and 78.2 percent of women

 

Additional Resources:

·         CDC Statistics on Overweight and Obesity:http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html

·         Obesity in America: By the Numbers http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2012/05/obesity-in-america-by-the-numbers-1.html

HYPERTENSION

High Blood Pressure Facts

(http://www.cdc.gov/bloodpressure/facts.htm)

 Levels Vary by Age

 Women are about as likely as men to develop high blood pressure during their lifetimes. However, for people under 45 years old, the condition affects more men than women. For people 65 years and older, it affects more women than men.

Age Men (%) Women (%)
20-34

11.1

6.8

35-44

25.1

19.0

45-54

37.1

35.2

55-64

54.0

53.3

65-74

64.0

69.3

75 and older

66.7

78.5

All

34.1

32.7

Levels Vary by Race and Ethnicity

 African Americans develop high blood pressure more often, and at an earlier age, than whites and Mexican Americans do. Among African Americans, more women than men have the condition.

Race of Ethnic Group Men (%) Women (%)
African Americans

43.0

45.7

Mexican Americans

27.8

28.9

Whites

33.9

31.3

All

34.1

32.7

HEART DISEASE

Heart Disease Facts

(http://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/data_statistics/fact_sheets/fs_heart_disease.htm)

·         Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. More than half of the deaths due to heart disease in 2009 were in men.

·         About 600,000 Americans die from heart disease each year—that’s 1 in every 4 deaths.

·         Coronary heart disease is the most common type of heart disease, killing more than 385,000 people annually.

·         In the United States, someone has a heart attack every 34 seconds. Each minute, someone in the United States dies from a heart disease-related event.

·         Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people of most racial/ethnic groups in the United States, including African Americans, Hispanics, and whites. For Asian Americans or Pacific Islanders and American Indians or Alaska Natives, heart disease is second only to cancer.

·         Coronary heart disease alone costs the United States $108.9 billion each year. This total includes the cost of health care services, medications, and lost productivity.

Article by Darci L. Graves,  MA, MA, MPP

Health Power Editor on Spirituality, Culture and Health, and Aging; and Senior Health Education and Policy Specialist at SRA International, Inc.